I have pretty much winged it in terms of running gear, and through trial and error have found certain things that I have come to love. Have a product you’d like me to review? I will give an honest appraisal on this site. Just send an e-mail to me at linda@theaccidentalmarathoner.com and I will be happy to discuss our options!


Product Reviews

Race Recap: 2019 Rock 'n' Roll Las Vegas Half Marathon

December 2, 2019 12:00 pm

Disclaimer:  I received an entry to the Rock ‘n’ Roll Las Vegas Half Marathon to review as part of being a BibRave Pro. Learn more about becoming a BibRave Pro (ambassador), and check out BibRave.com to review, find, and write race reviews.

Hold a race in one of my favorite cities on earth, and it’s sure to be a good time. Throw in a meet-up with my best college friend and anything can (and will) happen! When the opportunity to run the Strip at Night came up, I was all in! Las Vegas is one of my favorite places – it has everything I love:  fabulous restaurants, great shows, good weather, and yes, gambling! My husband and I visit Vegas once or twice a year and now that all of our kids are of age, we’ve made a family tradition of it! While the boys wouldn’t be joining us this time around, my best friend from college and her husband (whom we also went to college with) would, and what perfect timing as this year marks 40 years of friendship! Seriously, where does the time go? While I’ve never run this race, I did run the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon in Chicago last year, and since I loved the experience so much, I knew Las Vegas would not disappoint.

Though we all live in the Chicago area, we flew in from different airports on different airlines and met up at the airport in Las Vegas. Mary cracked me up with her little sign with our last name waiting for us at baggage claim. We hopped in a cab and the non-stop conversation and laughter began, just like old times. When we arrived at our hotel only one room was ready, so we dropped everything off and headed to the expo, which was held at the Las Vegas Convention Center, just a quick taxi ride away.

We arrived at the expo early on Friday afternoon and it was not crowded at all. Everything was clearly marked and since we would both be running the 5K on Saturday, we picked up those packets first and then went our separate ways since Mary (and her friend Emily) would be running the 10K and I would be running the half marathon on Sunday. From there, we wandered around the expo, checked out a few vendor booths, and then headed back to the hotel. Since we are such gambling fools, we had two rooms comped at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel, my favorite place to stay. The hold up with one room not being ready was because we requested rooms on the same floor. Ultimately, we were set up just five rooms apart. Tom and Mary had a bit of a better view of the Bellagio fountains, but we didn’t plan to spend that much time in our rooms anyway.

We chilled for a bit and then headed outside to walk around and see the sights. Tom had never been to Las Vegas, so it was all about pointing out and stopping at some of our favorite places for him to see. We had dinner that night at Mon Ami Gabi so Mary could get her steak and frites fix. Thus began a weekend of eating and drinking and eating and eating, and eating some more! After dinner we walked around a bit more and checked out a few casinos, then headed back to our rooms for an early-to-bed since we were dealing with a four hour flight and a two hour time change.

After breakfast on Saturday morning we met up with Emily and Paul, Tom and Mary’s friends from Alaska. Sunday’s 10K would be Emily’s first race, and she was definitely ready to take on the challenge. We did lots more walking around (and a little bit more gambling) before Mary and I needed to get to the start area for the 5K. Having not read the instructions carefully, we wound up at the start area for the next day’s races, which was alarmingly desolate just an hour before race time. We made our way back to our hotel as we were trying to figure out where to go. Luckily the hotel porter had placed several other guests in taxis headed to the race venue, so he knew just where to instruct the taxi driver to take us. I might have gotten a little panicky as it took us over a half hour to move just two miles in the crazy Las Vegas traffic, but our driver was awesome and got us there with plenty of time to spare. Mary and I rushed ahead of the group so we could do a quick potty stop and then head to our respective corrals. Much to our delight, to the side of the porta-potties was a huge brick building with a good 30+ clean and warm bathroom stalls. That right there calmed all of my panicked nerves! We snapped a few pics together before the race, wearing our matching tanks commemorating our 40 years of friendship.

Unlike the races the following day, the 5K course did not involve running on the strip. The course was mostly dark with little spectator support and a few bands playing along the way. There was just one aid station at about Mile 2. I was feeling the effects of the dry desert air by then, so I stopped and grabbed two cups of water before I started to run again. The race ended at the same place it started. I saw Bob, Tom, Emily, and Paul just before the finish, then looped back around to them once I crossed the finish line so the five of us could cheer Mary on as she came through. I jumped on the course with her for a few yards before the finish, just to give her some support and encouragement as she ran to the finish.

The post-5K race party was fantastic with Kesha headlining the show. We stayed for just a bit and then headed back to our hotel to get cleaned up and ready for the obligatory pasta load at Lombardi’s Romagna Mia. After dinner we were all pretty wiped, so we headed back to our rooms and slept for what seemed like forever.

On Sunday morning the six of us headed to Hash House a Go Go for a very filling breakfast. With such a late start to the race (4:00 p.m. for the 10K and 4:30 p.m. for the half), we would have plenty of time to digest our meals. I tried to nap before the race but since I slept so well the night before, I just relaxed in my hotel room for a few hours. The 10K race would start in the same place the 5K started the day before, but luckily for me, the half and full marathon races started directly behind our hotel.

At around 3:00 p.m. I headed out. The weather was great as I walked around the staging area. I recognized Konfedence, AKA Ken, a mutual follower from Instagram and said hello as he was heading to gear check to drop his bag. There was a stage with a band playing, so I listened for a while before heading to the start gate. It seemed we were standing around forever before the crowd finally started to move. We probably walked a good half mile to the actual start line on the Strip. As we walked I met a runner with Chicago roots, now living in Florida. Oddly enough the name on her bib was Gary. I couldn’t help but wonder if I was face-to-face with a bandit but decided not to get into it as the race was about to start. We parted ways and I never saw her (or him) again.

We headed south on Las Vegas Boulevard (AKA the Strip), past the famous “Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas” sign. There was a band playing and many people stopped and waited in line for a photo in front of the iconic sign. I kept moving. We looped around and headed back north. There’s not much to see at that end of the Strip unless, of course, you are into airports. Once we approached Excalibur, New York, New York, and the surrounding venues the bright lights appeared and it with it now being dark, it finally felt like we were running the “Strip at Night”. We ran the length of the Strip all the way downtown to Old Las Vegas and Fremont Street. We spent very little time in that area which was fine given the fact it seemed a little more remote and off the beaten path (read:  sketchy). We headed back south on the Strip and the lights once again appeared. Full marathon participants veered to the right while those of us doing the half veered to the left.

Around Mile 11 we were told there was no more water at the aid station, but were assured there would be plenty just a few hundred feet ahead. I brought three Gatorade Endurance gels and decided to take my third at that point. Because my throat got so dry at the 5K the day before, I brought a bunch of cough drops with me and I pretty much had one in my mouth the entire time, which was my saving grace. I hydrated like crazy the day before and the morning of the race, but that desert air is no joke.

I knew to start watching for Bob and the gang once I made the turn toward the Mirage. About a half mile before the finish I spotted Paul as he called out my name. He said the others were just a bit ahead, which gave me a much needed boost. It is always so good to see friends and family along a race course! Paul started running alongside the course and with about a quarter mile to go I saw everyone else and waved to my husband and friends as I ran to the finish. The finish line was located in front of the Forum Shops at Caesars Palace, but we had to walk for what seemed like forever to be able to exit the course. Because we participated in races two days in a row, besides the individual race medals, Mary and I also earned the Remix medal, which is shaped like an old boom box to match the Rock ‘n’ Roll theme.

The six of us reunited, took a few pictures, and then Paul had the bright idea that Mary, Emily, and I should lay in the middle of the Strip for a photo op. Seriously, when else can you lay down in the middle of the Las Vegas Strip and not be run over or arrested? Never mind the fact that the lights behind us were from the row of police cars heading our way as they were re-opening the Strip to traffic. After that we headed back to our hotel to get cleaned up and ready for an always-amazing dinner at my favorite Las Vegas restaurant, Joe’s Seafood, Prime Steak, and Stone CrabI can’t believe I ate the whole thing. Yes I can.

The following morning Emily and Paul headed out early and Bob and I met up with Tom and Mary for breakfast. They checked out of the hotel and left for the airport, but Bob and I stayed for an additional two days. We went to Giada for dinner and saw Penn & Teller (comped tickets because gambling fools) on Monday night and then went to dinner at Mesa Grill on Tuesday, before rallying to win back any money we had lost over the course of the previous few days. A good time was had by all!

This was a fabulous race weekend and I would do it again in a heartbeat. It was especially fun to be with great friends, old and new. The expo was average – not too small and not too big, nicely spread out with plenty of vendors to visit. The 5K race was a bit chaotic at the start with people self-seeding in obviously incorrect corrals. The course was quiet but the fest at the end of the race made up for all of that. The half/full marathon start was much better organized and the pre-race festivities/band were great. The course was mostly fun with just a few dead zones. There were spectators along the course on the main area of the Strip, but it seemed as if the majority of them were there for Vegas and not necessarily interested in seeing a race. I’m sure many of them didn’t even know a race was going on until they came across a Strip that was closed to traffic.

As far as swag, the participant shirts were kind of meh but the finishers’ medals were awesome. This is a fun race weekend and while there are serious racers out there, I’d say the vast majority of runners/walkers are out there for a good time. Las Vegas is one of my favorite places to vacation, so adding a race to an extended weekend visit gives me one more excuse to visit.

Have you ever run any of the Rock ‘n’ Roll races? Which was your favorite? Are you a fan of Las Vegas?

On my 2020 Race Calendar:

March 1, 2020:  Tokyo Marathon

March 15, 2020:  Amita Health St. Paddy’s Day Half Marathon

 

Gatorade Endurance: Fuel for the Long Run

November 27, 2019 12:00 pm

Disclaimer:  I received a generous supply of Gatorade Endurance as part of being a BibRave Pro. Learn more about becoming a BibRave Pro (ambassador), and check out BibRave.com to review, find, and write race reviews.

And so ends my 2019 race year, and what a fabulous year it has been! I started training with Gatorade Endurance Formula and Energy Gels in August, and it has carried me through not only my training, but also through a 5K, two 10Ks, two half marathons, and two full marathons. With Gatorade Endurance products, I think I’ve found my magic.

Gatorade Endurance Formula is different than ‘regular’ Gatorade in that it contains twice the sodium and three times the potassium as the regular formulation. It’s designed especially for endurance athletes because of course when we sweat, we don’t just lose water; we also lose electrolytes. You know that gritty white powder you can feel on your skin at the end of a long endurance activity? That’s salt! So drinking tons of plain water during an endurance event is not the best idea. You need to replace the electrolytes you are losing as well.

As I mentioned in a previous post, my former race strategy was to drink tons of water (on average, about a liter every five miles) as a way to stay hydrated during a long run. All that did was leave me waterlogged and needing to stop at the porta-potties along the way. With two big goal races planned for this fall, I decided to spend this past summer focusing on my fueling. A main goal was to be able to run a full marathon without having to stop to pee, and since I am a slow runner, that means a lot of hours on the course. I was outfitted with enough Gatorade Endurance to cover the entire training cycle, so there was no reason not to give it a go.

I received an ample supply of both powder and gel products in a variety of flavors, along with some basic instructions on what to take in based on the duration of the activity. It was nice to have some direction until I could figure out exactly what would work for me. I mainly used the powder products when I was home, because it was easy to mix a bottle and run out the door. For travel, I used a combination of powders and gels, since I had plenty of single-serve packets that were easy to toss in my carry-on without taking up much room. The closer I got to the fall marathon dates, the more I experimented with how and when to take the gels, since they would be my main fuel source during the races. Because both the Chicago Marathon and the New York City Marathon would be supplying Gatorade Endurance Formula at the aid stations, I only needed to carry the gels and not worry about lugging around a handheld bottle.

After experimenting with different amounts per run, I came up with the following:  For runs six or seven miles or less, I would eat something light (usually a handful of almonds, walnuts, and raisins) and then carry my handheld bottle of Gatorade Endurance Formula powder mixed in 24 ounces of water. That was plenty to get me through the miles, even on hot, humid days. In fact, I often didn’t finish the entire bottle. For runs longer than that, I would typically bring the same amount of water/powder mix, but would also take a gel pouch just before the run and then every five miles thereafter. This is what worked for me; what works for someone else may differ, so it’s important to try different things until you find what works best for you.

 

I had several flavors to try and while I had some favorites (hello, watermelon and blackberry!), they all tasted good. I don’t like sweets, and the Gatorade Endurance Energy Gels were not sickeningly sweet like some other products I’ve tried. The energy gels were a great consistency–not too thick or sticky, and didn’t require me to drink water to help get them down.

My big test would be the New York City Marathon, which I ran earlier this month. Knowing I would be sitting in Runners’ Village for several hours before the race, I brought what seemed like enough food to feed an army for my pre-race fueling. I was happy to see the big table of Gatorade Endurance Formula being handed out before the race. I wound up eating my usual handful of nuts and raisins and just a bagel with peanut butter and a banana about an hour before my wave started, and then took a cup from the table to drink as I walked to the start line. I carried five Gatorade Endurance Energy Gel pouches in my SPIBelt. I took the first gel at around Mile 4, and then one about every four to five miles after that. I alternated between taking water and taking Gatorade Endurance Formula at the aid stations.

So the big question…how did it go? In a word:  Perfect! I had enough energy to conquer the bridges (my biggest fear going into the race), felt adequately hydrated, and most importantly – never felt the need to stop to pee! I finished the marathon a full 10 minutes faster than the flat Chicago Marathon just three weeks earlier, even having stopped to hug my husband and friend and snap a few pictures along the way. I felt fantastic after the race and in the days after, and I have no doubt that proper fueling and hydrating before and during the race had a great deal to do with it.

I really do think that in Gatorade Endurance I have found my fuel for the long run. I’ll continue to use it as I train (who IS this person???) for my upcoming Tokyo Marathon next year. My only goal for Tokyo (besides having fun) is staying ahead of the balloon ladies!

What’s your go-to fuel endurance sports? Have you tried Gatorade Endurance? Tell me what you think!

So far on my 2020 Race Calendar:

March 1, 2020:  Tokyo Marathon

Team in Training: Running for a Cause

November 25, 2019 12:00 pm

Disclaimer:  I received the opportunity to run the New York City marathon as a fundraiser for Team in Training as part of being a BibRave Pro. Learn more about becoming a BibRave Pro (ambassador), and check out BibRave.com to review, find, and write race reviews.

As part of my quest to become an Abbott World Marathon Majors Six Star Finisher, I received my fourth star in New York City earlier this month. With no chance of entering using a qualifying time, my options were to try the ballot (lottery) or to enter via the charity route. My son and I were not chosen for the lottery this year, so when the opportunity to run for a charity arose, I grabbed it in a New York Minute! Charity fundraising is not new to me and in fact, I’ve been at it since high school. Specific to the World Marathon Majors, this was my third time running for charity, having run the 2015 Chicago Marathon and the 2019 London Marathon for charity organizations.

From the moment I signed on with Team in Training, I felt like I was part of a family. It all started with a team phone call where we would meet the coaches and some of our fellow Team in Training members. We learned about the organization’s mission as well as some facts about the amazing work they have done raising money for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). We also shared stories of why running for Team in Training was important to us. Each of us either knew someone or was personally affected by blood cancer.

Team in Training was started in 1988 by a man who wanted to honor his daughter, a leukemia survivor. He assembled a team for the New York City Marathon, and together they raised over $300,000.00. Just over 30 years later, Team in Training has raised more than $1.5 billion for LLS, helping fund research and support families affected by blood cancers including leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma.

Besides of course the opportunity to raise funds for a great cause, the opportunity to run with a team was of utmost importance to me. The camaraderie, and especially the accountability, were just what I needed to keep me motivated throughout the process. As many of you know, I am historically not good at training for races, but with the threat of not one, but FIVE bridges (read:  mountains) to cross, I needed to be more disciplined and actually train for this race.

One of the many things that kept me motivated was the texts I would receive from Jaimie, the Team in Training Campaign Manager. She would check in to see how I was doing, congratulate me on my fundraising progress, and offer tips to help me meet my goals. She was especially helpful when, less than 24 hours before the race, I decided to change my transportation to the race start. Jaimie went out of her way to make sure I was all set for race morning.

Another huge motivator was the TCS New York City Marathon Team In Training 2019 Facebook Group. There, team members would ask questions, seek advice, and together ride the emotional rollercoaster of training for a big race. We shared fundraising tips, supported each others’ fundraising efforts, and lifted each other up along the way.

Through Team in Training we had access to SixCycle, a training platform where athletes and coaches communicate and work together to achieve set goals. Setup was easy and I was able to sync it with my Strava account, so my training runs automatically populated my training calendar. At the initial setup I imported my goals for the race, and then a training program was set for me to follow. Due to work, travel and other pre-scheduled races over the course of the summer I wasn’t able to follow the plan exactly, but I did the best I could and especially in the final weeks before the race, I kept on track to help prepare me for New York. Within the SixCycle platform we could communicate with our coach, Jeff, as well as with other members of the team. We received motivational support and were able to ask questions and get advice along the way.

 

The day before the marathon I attended the Team in Training luncheon. Held at the beautiful Guastavino’s venue, a New York City designated interior landmark, team members and their supporters were treated to a fabulous lunch and one of the most exciting ‘pep rallies’ I have ever attended. We heard moving stories from families affected by blood cancers, and uplifting accounts of how instrumental LLS was in their own personal experiences. We learned that as a team we had raised over $1.2 million as of race weekend, though as of today that number is approaching $1.4 million.

Race morning I walked the block or two to the hotel where our team bus would pick us up for the early morning ride to Staten Island. Coffee, water, and breakfast foods were available to team participants. I met up with Sandy, a fellow team member whom I met at the luncheon the day before. It would be his first marathon and we had a blast getting to know each other on our way to Runners’ Village. It was nice to have someone to talk with to help settle those early race morning nerves.

Once at Runners’ Village, I grabbed a coffee and the obligatory Dunkin’ Donuts beanie and found a place to settle for the three hour wait before my start. There I met fellow BibRave Pro Danielle, who was in the same corral and wave as I was. We chatted and got to know each other a bit and eventually walked to the start line together. Since I was planning to do a run/walk interval, we ran together for maybe the first half mile or so and then parted ways. I caught up with her again at about Mile 2, but wouldn’t see her after that.

Throughout the race I saw so many fellow Team in Training members. It was fun to shout, “Go Team!” and give so many people a pat on the back and give and receive words of encouragement along the way. Coach Jeff jumped on the course with me just before Mile 14 and again at Mile 22. He would run with me for a block or two, check in to make sure I was doing okay, and offer words of encouragement just when I needed them most. His final tips just before I entered Central Park really motivated me and helped me finish my 12th marathon in my third fastest time, 10 minutes faster than flat Chicago just three weeks earlier.

Running the New York City Marathon as part of Team in Training was an amazing experience, and I would definitely do it again. The support and encouragement throughout the process was second to none, and access to a training plan and an awesome coach made the entire experience well-worth it.

Have you ever run a race as a charity fundraiser? Did you achieve your fundraising goals? Who out there has run for Team in Training?

So far on my 2020 Race Calendar:

March 1, 2020:  Tokyo Marathon

Race Recap: Urban Bourbon Half Marathon

November 15, 2019 12:00 pm

Disclaimer:  I received an entry to the Urban Bourbon Half Marathon to review as part of being a BibRave Pro. Learn more about becoming a BibRave Pro (ambassador), and check out BibRave.com to review, find, and write race reviews.

I recently ran the Urban Bourbon Half Marathon in Louisville, Kentucky and I am still reeling with excitement over such a great race! I love Louisville and I haven’t been there in a number of years, so I was really looking forward to hitting up some of my favorite places while in town (insider’s tip:  DO visit Seviche Restaurant if you ever travel to Louisville). This was a quick trip for me – I flew in on Friday morning, ran the race on Saturday, and then flew back home late that afternoon. Still, I was able to pack in a lot of fun.

Packet pickup was held at Louisville Slugger Field, so that in itself made the trip fun! While the ballpark was closed, it was a beautiful day out and it was easy to walk around and peek into the park.

Inside, volunteers cheerfully handed out race packets and participant shirts, which were made of a gorgeous brick-colored long-sleeved dri-fit material. Aside from bourbon, Fleur de Lis was the theme and was nicely patterned on the shirt, featuring highlights of the race itself. Extra shirts were available for exchange, which was nice for me since the size I ordered was a little too big. As the race sponsor, Jim Beam had a table at the expo, where tastings were available for race participants. Who knew bourbon comes in so many varietals? My favorite at the expo was the Basil Hayden’s. It was quite smooth and went down easy!

 

At the expo I met Corey, a fellow BibRave Pro who was volunteering at packet pickup. Isn’t it fun to meet online friends in real life? You can barely tell us apart in our matching BibRave gear! Though small, I mulled around the expo for a bit before heading to the streets and checking out the downtown area. I was approached at the expo by race director Mike Clemson, who was so nice and so grateful for BibRave’s involvement in the race. While I would never be in contention for them, check out the prizes for the men’s and women’s first place finishers!

 

 

 

Another fun feature of this race was the Urban Bourbon Walk, where race finishers can visit up to seven different establishments after the race on Saturday and receive a special Fleur de Lis cloisonné pin. I might have strong-armed a few of the establishments into giving me a pin a day early. After all, I had a flight home to catch after the race!

Race morning I was up early and anxious to run. I arrived at the venue way earlier than I needed to, but I wanted to make sure to get a close parking spot, plus there was a meetup arranged before the race for several of the BibRave Pros, and I wanted to be sure to be there to meet more of my online running friends. I walked from the parking lot with a few other runners, one of which had run the race in prior years. She warned me about the hills starting at about Mile 7. I was happy to be armed with that information before the race. Did I mention I HATE hills?

While waiting in the queue for the race to start, I saw a familiar face, but I could not figure out how I knew him. After achieving legit stalker status for circling around three or four times, I finally approached and asked where I might know him from. After talking for a few minutes I finally realized he was none other than IronMan World Championship competitor Craig Taylor, a friend of my eldest son’s (he finished KONA this year in a time of 9:19:38). It’s so fun running into people at races!

The pre-race atmosphere was loads of fun with music playing and seemingly relaxed runners enjoying the morning before the race start. As a nice touch, the Kentucky Derby Bugler played My Old Kentucky Home, followed by The Star Spangled Banner, and then the elite runners were on their way. The rest of us inched our way forward and started our run. Just about a quarter mile into the race, someone approached me from behind and asked me if I am The Accidental Marathoner. Why, yes I am! It turns out he and I follow each other on social media. We chatted for a bit and then went our separate ways. He would go on to crush a major PR that day.

The course took us through parts of Louisville with a slow, gradual decline as we headed toward Cherokee Park. I took advantage of the downward slope and kept my speed up, fully aware I would slow down once we hit the hilly areas of the park. Despite the hills, I maintained a fairly steady pace and continued to run at a pretty consistent speed.

The race finished on Liberty Street, just a block or two away from Fourth Street Live!, where the post-race party would be held. This is hands-down the best post-race event I’ve ever experienced! Race participants were treated to food, beer, and samplings of bourbon from around the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. Entertainment was provided by the band The Crashers, who had everyone dancing in the streets. The party lasted until 12:30 p.m., which allowed plenty of time to eat, drink, and be merry.

     

 

I’ve run several wine-themed races, but never a bourbon-themed one. The Urban Bourbon Half Marathon was a fabulous race and I loved everything about it. Held in one of my favorite places, I will definitely run this race again. The swag, the post-race party, and the race itself were second to none.

 

Have you ever run the Urban Bourbon Half Marathon? I would definitely recommend this race to anyone. Sign up for next year’s race with a few running friends. You are guaranteed to have a good time!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So far on my 2020 Race Calendar:

March 1, 2020:  Tokyo Marathon

 

I’m linking up with Kim and Zenaida for Tuesday Topics! If you’d like to join along, just follow this link for the linkup rules and a list of upcoming topics. Be sure to check out to Kim’s and Zenaida’s blogs, and visit some of the other linkers while you are there!

Product Review: Orange Mud Transition and Seat Wrap 2.0

November 6, 2019 10:00 am

 

Disclaimer:  I received an Orange Mud Transition and Seat Wrap 2.0 to review as part of being a BibRave Pro. Learn more about becoming a BibRave Pro (ambassador), and check out BibRave.com to review, find, and write race reviews.

Sweat much? Yeah, me too. Especially after long runs. I’m actually otherwise not much of a sweater, but certainly after long runs or races I can get pretty soaked. This year more than any other, I did a bunch of races in Chicago. That meant a number of early morning drives into the city and then immediately driving back home after the race. I typically just want to get home, so I don’t always take the time to change out of my sweaty clothes before I get into my car. Ew.

The Orange Mud Transition and Seat Wrap has been a bit of a godsend for me. For one, I often am freezing cold after a race, so just the opportunity to wrap a warm, dry towel around myself feels incredible. The towel is a generous 30″ wide X 60″ long, so it’s big enough to cover my upper body and around my hips as you seen in the photo here, taken after the Chicago Marathon. The towel is made of a soft microfiber material (80% polyester/20% polyamide) and is machine washable.

One edge of the towel has a zipper which, when closed, makes that end almost like a hood, which makes it a great fit for over a car seat. With the zipper closed, the towel can be ‘hooded’ over the headrest, which makes it stay in place and not slip. Of course you can also wear it as a long hooded cape if you want!

Another great feature is the adjustable clip belt that allows the towel to be wrapped around your body and clipped in place so you can easily change in and out of your workout gear while maintaining some semblance of decency. Here is a great depiction of how it can be used, grabbed from the Orange Mud website:

 

Despite its generous size, the towel is lightweight and easily packable in a carry-on bag. I recently ran the Urban Bourbon Half Marathon in Louisville, Kentucky, and I’m sure the person who got the rental car after I returned it would be grateful to know I didn’t sweat all over the seat after the race! I let the towel air out in my hotel room before my flight back home, and then just packed it up in its original zip-close packaging to keep it separated from the other items in my carry-on bag for during the trip home.

 

The wrap is a great addition to any athlete’s workout gear, and can be used after any activity that makes you work up a sweat. They come in a variety of fun colors. The one I have is Caribbean Blue. The holidays will be here before we know it, and with a $39.95 price tag, they would make a great gift for the athlete in your life. I’m happy to have had the opportunity to test out this product, and I’m sure I will be using it over and over again.

If you’d like to try one yourself, you can save 15% off of your purchase at the Orange Mud website using code BIBRAVEWRAP.

Check out more reviews by some of my fellow BibRave Pros:  Kelly, Karen, Corey, Deanne, Ryan, Mai, Mark, Christine, and Samantha!

 

All Reviews

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *